We link cognitive models of categorization, attention, and cognitive control with neurophysiological data. We formulated competing stochastic models of perceptual decisions and control over those decisions. These models are tested by fitting them to behavior of humans and macaque monkeys. The models are further evaluated by contrasting the accumulation of evidence in the models with the changing patterns of single unit neural activity recorded from awake behaving monkeys. One focus of this project has been stopping and stepping decisions to move the eyes to a target object in the visual display.

Logan, G.D., Schall, J.D., & Palmeri, T.J. (in preparation). Neural models of stopping and going (working title). Manuscript in preparation. To appear in B. Forstmann & E.J. Wagenmakers (Eds.), An Introduction to Model-Based Cognitive Neuroscience, Springer Neuroscience.

Logan, G.D., Yamaguchi, M., & Schall, G.D., & Palmeri, T.J. (under revision). Inhibitory control in mind and brain 2.0: A blocked-input model of saccadic countermanding. Manuscript under revision.

Pouget, P., Logan, G.D., Palmeri, T.J., Boucher, L., & Schall, J.D. (2011). Neural basis of adaptive response time adjustment. The Journal of Neuroscience, 31 (35), 12604-12612.

Nelson, M.J., Boucher, L., Logan, G.D., Palmeri, T.J., Schall, J.D. (2010). Nonindependent and nonstationary response time in stopping and stepping saccade tasks. Attention, Perception, & Performance, 72, 1913-1929.

Camalier, C.R., Gotler, A., Murthy, A., Thompson, K.G., Logan, G.D., Palmeri, T.J., & Schall, J.D. (2007). Dynamics of saccade target selection: Race model analysis of double step and search step saccade production in human and macaque. Vision Research, 47, 2187-2211.

Boucher, L., Palmeri, T.J., Logan, G.D., Schall, J.D. (2007). Inhibitory control in mind and brain: An interactive race model of countermanding saccades. Psychological Review, 114, 376-397.

Boucher, L., Stuphorn, V., Logan, G.D., Schall, J.D., & Palmeri, T.J. (2007). Stopping eye and hand movements: Are the processes independent? Perception & Psychophysics, 69, 785-801.